Night traffic. Cars on highway road at sunset evening in typical busy american city.

Expressways are designed to move traffic along faster than on regular roads. However, the higher volume traffic and speed of vehicles mean that, when accidents occur, they can be serious or even fatal. Follow these tips to stay safe.

Observe safe expressway etiquette to keep you and other drivers out of harm’s way:

JUST BEYOND THE HIGHWAY

Watch out for traffic lights and crosswalks that may be situated at highway entrances and exits; they present accident risks. Be cautious and watch out for pedestrians crossing the junction and sudden braking by other motorists.

SPEED UP TO ENTER

Gradually increase your speed as you enter to match pace with drivers already on the expressway; if not, it may cause accidents, especially if the cars behind are approaching fast. Always give priority to traffic that is already on the expressway, but do not linger at the road shoulder for too long.

GIVE WAY TO OTHERS

When you are on the expressway, anticipate and allow vehicles to merge. Better yet, filter to the next lane and leave the lane open for merging traffic; otherwise, be prepared to slow down.

PREPARE TO EXIT

Pay attention to the exit point and filter to the exit lane ahead of time. If your exit is coming up but you are not in the correct lane, do not put yourself and other drivers in danger by recklessly cutting across multiple lanes. It’s better to miss an exit than risk an accident. If you are exiting, be sure to slow down once you have reached the slip road.

If you have just missed it, do not attempt to reverse, even if there are no cars behind.

DON’T HOG OVERTAKING LANE

The far-left lane is reserved for overtaking and not for your hogging or racing pleasure. Once you have overtaken, move back into your original lane.

MAINTAIN A SAFE DISTANCE

As you drive faster on expressways than on regular roads, keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front

of you to avoid a collision. Use the three-second rule: focus on a building or an object that the vehicle in front of you has just passed, then time how long it takes for you to reach the same point. It should take you at least three seconds.

Penalty Lane hogging and tailgating are considered driving without reasonable consideration for other road users. A first-time offender is liable for a fine not exceeding $1,000, or imprisonment not exceeding six months, or both.

GO WITH THE FLOW

Be patient and avoid tailgating the car in front, especially during traffic jams.